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Dr. Millie Cordaro

Psychology
Texas State University Round Rock Campus


Dr. Millie CordaroAbout Our Rising Star


Full Name: Mildred Cordaro

Hometown: Ormond Beach, FL

Degrees & Majors:

  • Ph.D. in Lifespan Development Psychology
  • Licensed Professional Counselor

Fields of Research and Interest:

  • Pet Loss and Disenfranchised Grief
  • Optimal Relational Functioning
  • Cognitive-Behavioral Techniques

 


What Dr. Cordaro Enjoys About Her Job


"Ironically, when I first started my doctorate, my main goal was to conduct research. As part of my graduate assistantship, I had to teach a class every semester. After my first year of teaching my professional goals changed: I enjoyed the meaningful connections I was fostering with students while sharing with them the theories and concepts of psychology that still fascinate me.

I had a wonderful mentor, Dr. Sam Mathews, when I was an undergraduate student. He facilitated the teaching of psychology by engaging students with a warm, yet challenging Socratic method. I strive to impart a similar learning environment for my own students."


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"I moved to Austin from Miami, FL after completing my PhD. I have enjoyed my transition to Texas State; my students have taught me a lot about the culture and lifestyle of Central Texas.

I have a passion for international travel. This past summer I visited Vancouver and parts of Spain and France. I think that traveling is transformative; I like to reflect on how every trip subtly changes a person’s identity and worldview.

I maintain a small counseling practice in downtown Austin. Counseling clients enhances the courses I teach, and teaching helps me to better conceptualize treatment planning for clients. The two really complement each other. Typically, the articles I write are based on theories and techniques used in teaching or counseling. I appreciate how my professional endeavors outside the classroom enhance my teaching style.

Over the past year, I have been volunteering my counseling expertise; I enjoy connecting with diverse populations. Most recently, I underwent training to become a disaster mental health volunteer for the Central Texas wildfires. Also, through Austin Pets Alive, a local animal rescue organization, I counseled individuals who lost their beloved pets to the wildfire. It’s an overlooked area of counseling that needs to be addressed. I recently wrote an article on pet loss that will be published next year in the Journal of Mental Health Counseling."


What do you teach?


"I teach several courses including Lifespan Development, Adolescent Psychology, Intro to Clinical Psychology, Abnormal Psychology and Adulthood and Aging."


Years of Experience


"I am starting my fourth year at the Texas State-Round Rock Campus."


Dr. Cordaro and the Psychology Program


"The psychology program at the Round Rock Campus has grown during my time here. Every semester, we are offering a wider variety of face-to-face classes for our students, along with online and hybrid course options. For the past 2 years, I have been offering an optional service-learning component with the Texas Youth Hotline in my Adolescent Psychology course, Students are trained to listen and respond to at-risk teenagers and their families. It’s a unique opportunity for students to apply what they are learning in class, while fulfilling a community need. This semester, Abnormal Psychology was offered at the Round Rock Campus in a hybrid format—I am really pleased with the success and popularity of the hybrid format for this course.

I also offer opportunities for Individual Study for students interested in conducting research. In March 2010, several Round Rock students presented a research poster at the San Antonio Undergraduate Research Conference in Psychology. In fact, I am working with two students, Molly Foster and Christina Bryant, to present a poster at a research conference this spring.

In addition, I have been the Round Rock Psychology Association faculty advisor since it’s inception in 2008. Currently, we have 45 members of the association, and a competent and energetic executive board. Most recently, the RRPS raised $2500 and participated in the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) walk on October 8, 2011. Also, the RRPA will host the 3rd annual Stress Seminar on Nov. 2, 2011. The members of the association meet for informal events such as dinners and bowling. I am happy that the students have the organization to connect with one another; after all, attending class is just one part of the undergraduate experience."